Close
 Security code
Close

Breaking News with Geoman Subscription

 Security code
Close

Blog Newletter Subscription



 Security code

University Laser Scanning Project

A University requested Schneider to do a test project with mobile mapping and laser scanning on their campus to compare it to other traditional methods.

Schneider was able to save time by collecting more intricate data without detouring traffic or interrupting campus life, thus allowing for the upkeep of their GIS at a higher level of accuracy. The University also had a need to provide a more detailed campus map and gather improved data for their facilities group to use for design projects. This investment was able to produce more information that can be used not only for the University itself, but that could form the basis for a viable joint venture with the city and utility companies, thus saving on the initial cost.

The project included approximately 2 blocks of the campus (7500 lineal feet of roads and overall 13 acres). The surveying methods used for this project were conventional surveying for horizontal and vertical control, 3D terrestrial laser scanning, and mobile LiDAR. This project was collected in three phases in the field over a three day time period.

Phase one was to control points and targets for horizontal and vertical control. These control points were tied to Indiana University’s campus coordinate system. For phase two the area was then driven with the mobile LiDAR vehicle to gather along the streets and information that was in the line-of-site of the scanners. In phase three, the areas that were not in the line-of-site of the scanners were then picked up by using the terrestrial scanner.

Once the data was collected, the point clouds collected from the mobile LiDAR, and the 3D terrestrial scanner collected, all three were processed together in the office and the quality control was checked. Once all the data is checked, it was ready for extraction.

The client on this project was looking for one of the buildings to be 3D modeled, which included the line work for sidewalks, curb locations, visible sewer structures, area lights, building foot prints, and hydrants. This information was extracted and put into AutoCAD Revit and a format that could be imported directly into a GIS system.

Through use of utilizing conventional surveying, mobile mapping, and laser scanning on one project, Schneider was able to be more efficient in the field while collecting more data than conventional methods. This process also keeps the field crew out of harm’s way while surveying. With the use of the mobile LiDAR data could now be collected at speed limits posted in the area. This process did not impede traffic or block pedestrian walk ways on campus. The use of the 3D laser scanning technologies allowed for efficiency and safety to be one of the main focuses.