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3 Crucial steps for a Well Maintained Oil Pipeline Hazard Assessment

by Matt on September 3, 2015

In my previous post I mentioned that someone asked questions regarding GIS, oil pipeline hazard/damage assessment that I couldn’t answer. I’d like to take a little more focused dive into how you can help mitigate future oil hazards as it’s a hot topic that GIS can help greatly improve a communities understanding of.
 
Hazard assessment regarding long connected oil and gas pipelines helps you evaluate how different assets (buildings, critical facilities, natural resource areas) along those lines could be affected during a possible disaster. The best part is that you can keep an every changing geo-spatial model that will help maintain the operational efficiency of all your assets and help guide future decision making.
 
There is 3 key steps in the process of creating a well maintained oil pipeline hazard assessment. First, is having a well-kept oil pipeline shapefile that will be named the hazard map. By well-kept, I mean that pipeline is accurate and detailed. When it comes to oil pipeline the more detailed oriented a GIS layer is then the integrity of the data will improve. Detailed attributes data such as, leaks, past break areas, and type of pipe lining can all contribute to help guiding a beneficial hazard assessment.
 
Secondly is maintaining an inventory of assets that the community has. This is something that every community of all sizes should have (Contact us if you don’t!) It will definitely appear as more than one layer because the information will be come from different sources. Layers like, CAMA, critical facilities, special needs citizens, transportation, and natural resource areas are geo-spatial data that can be affected when something happens in a disaster.
 
Lastly is GIS gives you the ability to compare your hazard map to your asset map to estimate losses in situations. This GIS capability can start to help communities signal areas of weakness and help guide them in future decision making. When the worst possibly happens, a community will be better prepared to move quickly and make the right decisions to help citizens and infrastructure.
 
By starting off with these key steps, disasters can be assessed quickly and efficiently so you can take the appropriate measures.