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Asbuilts with Laser Scanning

by Cindy on August 28, 2014

Asbuilt data can be used in many ways, but how that data is collected can be critical.  Using 3D laser scanning to collect asbuilt data can not only be accurate, but efficient at the same time.
 
Asbuilts for the interior of a building can be conducted at any number of points during the construction process; for example, at the pre-drywall stage, one must check the floor flatness, near completion, to verify that the building was built in accordance with the plans.
 
Using laser scanning to asbuilt a building before the drywall goes up allows for the documentation of what is behind the walls.  This data can be added to a BIM (Building Information Modeling) and be used for future renovations.  This data can also be used in producing safety plans for building evacuation routes. 
 
Asbuilts of an electrical substation can be collected with laser scanning from outside the fence (depending on the size and range of the laser scanner), which can alleviate significant safety concerns.  This allows for data to be collected for documentation or for use in design, but keeps the laser scanning operator out of harm’s way.  It also saves the client’s time and cost from having a safety person onsite supervising the crew, if they otherwise were inside the substation fence.
 
Asbuilts of a gas regulator station can result in detailed information on the above-ground piping and valves. This data is extremely helpful if replacement parts are need.  The laser scan data can be accessed and viewed right from the office.  The scan data is so dense it appears to look like a picture; however, it is accurate data that dimensions can be taken from for many applications.
 
Once the asbuilt data is collected and processed the uses for the data are unlimited.  The data can be modeled and imported into a GIS (Geographic Information System) where attribute data can be attached to the linework or other features. The attribute data can include a wide variety of documentation, such as when the structure was built, structure type, structure size, parts model numbers, replacement schedules and the date of the last inspection.
 
In summary, conducting asbuilt measurements with a laser scanner can provide a tremendously valuable source of information for use in a huge variety purposes in a cost and time effective manner.